Laszlo Moholy Nagy

Alternative Name(s): -
Date of Birth: July 20, 1895
Place of Birth: Bacsborsod, Hungary
Date of Death: November 24, 1946
Focus: Painter, Photographer, Sculptor, Filmmaker
Art movement: Constructivism
Nationality: American

Famous Laszlo Moholy Nagy Artwork

Laszlo Moholy Nagy Biography

“Laszlo Moholy-Nagy studied to become a lawyer in Budapest, but he turned to photography and painting instead. He was interested in Dadaism and Constructivism, and was influenced by Kasimir Malevich and Naum Gabo.

Moholy-Nagy championed the New Photographer’s movement. He was renowned for his photograms. These were photographic images that were non-representational. The images were obtained directly from each subject, without the use of camera.

Moholy-Nagy moved to London in 1935, and he undertook the design of the highly futuristic scenes and sets for the film, Things to Come.

In 1937, he relocated to Chicago to take up the directorship of the New Bauhaus. The venture was short-lived, so he and others founded the School of Design. This school later became known as the Institute of Design in Chicago. Decades later, in 1998, the City of Chicago awarded Moholy-Nagy a Tribute Marker.

Moholy-Nagy saw technology in all its guises as the new religion. This included the invention, the construction and the maintenance of all machinery. For him, machines usurped spiritualism, and he embraced technology and technological advances wholeheartedly. Moholy-Nagy was always enthusiastic about using new media to innovate and create.

Notable works include:
- CHX
- Jealousy
- Composition A II
- CH Beata 2

Today, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy’s legacy lives on, and is demonstrated below:

- Laszlo Systems, the software company, was named in his honor.

- In Budapest, The Maholy-Nagy University of Art and Design is named for him.

- The National Gallery of Art in Washington, District of Columbia, displays his works.

- The Moholy-Nagy Foundation, Inc. was created in 2003 to provide information about the artist’s life and his body of works.

Moholy-Nagy championed the New Photographer’s movement. He was renowned for his photograms. These were photographic images that were non-representational. The images were obtained directly from each subject, without the use of camera.

Moholy-Nagy moved to London in 1935, and he undertook the design of the highly futuristic scenes and sets for the film, Things to Come.

In 1937, he relocated to Chicago to take up the directorship of the New Bauhaus. The venture was short-lived, so he and others founded the School of Design. This school later became known as the Institute of Design in Chicago. Decades later, in 1998, the City of Chicago awarded Moholy-Nagy a Tribute Marker.

Moholy-Nagy saw technology in all its guises as the new religion. This included the invention, the construction and the maintenance of all machinery. For him, machines usurped spiritualism, and he embraced technology and technological advances wholeheartedly. Moholy-Nagy was always enthusiastic about using new media to innovate and create. “